The advantages of dental implants

  • Dental implants offer multiple advantages over other treatment plans involving removable dentures when a patient is missing one or more teeth.
  • They allow the placement of fixed prostheses (that the patient cannot remove) or removable prostheses (that the patient can remove).
  • They are more comfortable and discreet, as they do not cause unpleasant friction or movement on the gums as in the case of removable prostheses not fixed by implants. Some implant-supported dentures may not even cover the palate at all.
  • No unpleasant adhesives (glue) are required to hold implant-supported prostheses in place.
  • They provide better stability of the artificial teeth, which facilitates chewing and digestion, improves comfort and makes it easier for the patient to speak.
  • They provide better stability of the artificial teeth, which facilitates chewing and digestion, improves comfort and makes it easier for the patient to speak.
  • They allow the chewing forces to be distributed evenly between the implants and the adjacent structures (gum, bone and remaining teeth) in the mouth, which helps to reduce the stress on these structures. In cases where healthy teeth are still in the mouth, the patient can expect to be able to keep these remaining teeth longer than if no implants were placed and the space created by the missing teeth remained vacant.
  • They help maintain the volume of the alveolar bone (the bone around the teeth) where teeth are missing by preventing its resorption. Indeed, when a tooth is no longer in the mouth, the part of the alveolar bone that retained it is no longer stimulated when the patient eats and it deteriorates little by little.
  • They do not require modifications to the shape of the adjacent teeth nor the loss of part of the enamel of these same teeth to support them as in the case of a traditional bridge.
  • They give the patient the impression of having natural teeth, both aesthetically and functionally, because they act as an artificial root anchored in the jawbone, just like a natural tooth root. The patient can therefore regain the natural features of his face impacted by the loss of several teeth and even his self-confidence.
  • The two main components of an implant, the artificial crown and the implant itself, will not be affected by dental caries.
  • Once osseointegration is complete, implants rarely need to be replaced and therefore offer a durable and reliable long-term solution. Despite their high initial cost, dental implants can be a good investment given their lifespan.
  • The success rate of an implant procedure, over a period of more than 15 years, is about 95% for all jaws combined and more specifically 90% for implants installed in the maxilla and 95% for implants installed in the mandible. The difference in the success rate between the two jaws is explained by the fact that the maxilla has a lower density than the mandible, which makes osseointegration somewhat more difficult to achieve.
  • The average lifespan of an implant is at least ten years, and it can theoretically remain in place for the lifetime of the patient. The lifespan of the crown, prosthesis or bridge installed on the implant is, however, shorter, like any other prosthesis.